Flat corneas

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Flat corneas

Postby Edo » Tue Jul 03, 2007 5:41 am

After reading this forum for several months now, I've finally gotten my first assessment. I was told that I am a candidate for surgery but that I have "flat corneas" and dry eyes. The surgeon did recommended IntraLase because of the flat corneas because it made a thinner flap.

I'm 27 years old.
My numbers are -5.75 and -5.25, I have 20/15.
Keratometry is 40.81x67 40.23x157 in the right and 40.32x21 40.66x111 in the left (don't know why there are so many numbers)
My pupils measure 6.69mm and 6.30mm scotopic
Corneas 605um and 589um.
Tear test 8mm and 13mm after 5 minutes.

Are there any other issues I should know about flat corneas? Such as, if I needed to wear contacts later on, could I? Can I still get touch-up surgery if I needed? Are complications with night vision worse?

Also, about dry eyes, can I reasonably expect the dry eyes symptoms after Lasik to resolve after 6 months or a year?

Finally, I've read this website pretty thoroughly and have decided that I don't perfect correction. However, if I don't achieve the target prescription, can I always wear glasses or contacts that would correct my new vision to 20/15 again?

Thanks for this great website!
Edo
 
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Re: Flat corneas

Postby LasikExpert » Tue Jul 03, 2007 6:55 am

Edo wrote:Are there any other issues I should know about flat corneas?


I bit of research reveals that the average normal cornea has a keratotomy (K) of about 45.0 diopters. You are significantly flatter than this norm. There are several issues that you should discuss with your surgeon(s).

A flat cornea with a mechanical microkeratome may be more likely to create a buttonhole flap. A buttonhole is a flap that the steel blade breaks the surface in the center, creating a hole. It is not a catastrophic problem, but it is a problem you want to avoid. The more planar shape of the Lasik flap created with a femtosecond laser may be more appropriate, as indicated by your surgeon.

To reduce myopia (nearsighted, shortsighted) vision the laser removes tissue for the center of the cornea, thus flattening the center. Your K after Lasik may be as flat as 34.0 D. This amount of flatness may contribute to poor vision quality by making your cornea significantly more oblate in shape than prolate. More surgery is likely to make your cornea even more flat.

Contact lenses are likely to be more difficult to fit with a post Lasik exceptionally flat cornea.

Edo wrote:Also, about dry eyes, can I reasonably expect the dry eyes symptoms after Lasik to resolve after 6 months or a year?


Dry eye concerns should be treated and stable before surgery. See Lasik Dry Eye. Lasik induced temporary dry eyes is a relative common problem, however for the vast majority of people the dry eye resolves within the normal six month healing period.

Edo wrote:However, if I don't achieve the target prescription, can I always wear glasses or contacts that would correct my new vision to 20/15 again?


It is possible, but this is not a reasonable expectation. The most anyone should expect after Lasik is 20/20 vision, even if you currently have better than 20/20 with corrective lenses. The flatness after Lasik may be a concern. There are no guarantees with any surgery, and you do have some issues that need to be investigated fully before you make a decision.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
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