surgery in two days, and having some concerns

If you are thinking about having Lasik, IntraLasik, PRK, LASEK, Epi-Lasik, RLE, or P-IOL eye surgery, this is the forum to research your concerns or ask your questions.

surgery in two days, and having some concerns

Postby STFalcon » Tue Jul 10, 2007 9:39 pm

I am 23 years old and have been wearing soft contacts for 12 years. My contact lens prescription is -5.25 in both eyes. I rarely wear glasses because I despise them and they get in the way of some activities I engage in regularly, like running and ballet. I haven't had huge problems with my contact lenses, but when I was 16, I had to switch to a different type of disposable lens because I got red rings around my irises, which my doctor said was due to my eyes not getting enough oxygen since I wear contacts for so many hours a day. I never really considered getting any type of refractive surgery until I was older and the technology was more developed, but over the last 1.5 years, I have had a corneal abrasion and a corneal ulcer, which I believe were due to my contacts. Both times, I had to wear glasses for 2 weeks, which I found infuriating. I was also nervous about contact lens wear after that because I didn't want to develop those problems again. After the ulcer, my ophthalmologist suggested LASIK, and I went through with all the testing. I was told that I was an excellent candidate for LASIK. I have been out of my contacts for almost a month now and have been excited for the surgery, but a friend of mine told me something that made me nervous.

She told me her ophthalmologist advised her against LASIK because it would "ruin her near vision," which is important for her career. As we are pursuing the same career path, she told me about this, and I started researching it. I didn't read anything about ruining near vision, but I did find some information that says that LASIK results in vision that is not quite as "crisp" as the vision you experience with corrective lenses like contacts or glasses. What I read said they call it "LASIK 20/20," indicating that you are still technically 20/20 according to the eye chart, but have reduced contrast vision and don't see things as crisply. The same source recommended that those pursuing careers working with fine details should strongly consider this factor before choosing refractive surgery.

I have not heard about this from any doctors or found any other sources to back this up. If you have any more information about this issue and/or can offer any insight, it would be greatly appreciated. I would really like to eliminate the need for corrective lenses, but I am not eager enough to risk jeopardizing my career for it at this time.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Sincerely,

Sarah
STFalcon
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 8:37 pm
Location: Illinois

Postby JPD » Tue Jul 10, 2007 10:41 pm

Some people may report such problems as you decribed as, "Lasik 20/20", but I haven't noticed any such thing in my case. I think these problems were more of an issue a few years ago with the older technology.

Rather then getting second hand info from your friend, you should talk to some opthomologist yourself and get the first hand information. A good idea would be to talk to an corneal specialist who also performes Lasik, to get a really informed opinion.

In terms of the "Lasik 20/20", and loss of contrast sensitivity issue, I can tell you it's very unlikely you vision will be RUINED.

Once you have the surgery you can't go back, and it sounds you have some legitimate concerns which need to researched and thought through. Considering that, I think having a procedure schedule in two days is way to soon for you.
JPD
 
Posts: 160
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2007 3:09 am
Location: Southern California

Re: surgery in two days, and having some concerns

Postby houstonman » Tue Jul 10, 2007 10:52 pm

STFalcon wrote:I am 23 years old and have been wearing soft contacts for 12 years. My contact lens prescription is -5.25 in both eyes. I rarely wear glasses because I despise them and they get in the way of some activities I engage in regularly, like running and ballet. I haven't had huge problems with my contact lenses, but when I was 16, I had to switch to a different type of disposable lens because I got red rings around my irises, which my doctor said was due to my eyes not getting enough oxygen since I wear contacts for so many hours a day. I never really considered getting any type of refractive surgery until I was older and the technology was more developed, but over the last 1.5 years, I have had a corneal abrasion and a corneal ulcer, which I believe were due to my contacts. Both times, I had to wear glasses for 2 weeks, which I found infuriating. I was also nervous about contact lens wear after that because I didn't want to develop those problems again. After the ulcer, my ophthalmologist suggested LASIK, and I went through with all the testing. I was told that I was an excellent candidate for LASIK. I have been out of my contacts for almost a month now and have been excited for the surgery, but a friend of mine told me something that made me nervous.

She told me her ophthalmologist advised her against LASIK because it would "ruin her near vision," which is important for her career. As we are pursuing the same career path, she told me about this, and I started researching it. I didn't read anything about ruining near vision, but I did find some information that says that LASIK results in vision that is not quite as "crisp" as the vision you experience with corrective lenses like contacts or glasses. What I read said they call it "LASIK 20/20," indicating that you are still technically 20/20 according to the eye chart, but have reduced contrast vision and don't see things as crisply. The same source recommended that those pursuing careers working with fine details should strongly consider this factor before choosing refractive surgery.

I have not heard about this from any doctors or found any other sources to back this up. If you have any more information about this issue and/or can offer any insight, it would be greatly appreciated. I would really like to eliminate the need for corrective lenses, but I am not eager enough to risk jeopardizing my career for it at this time.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Sincerely,

Sarah


Hello! Yeah im going to be having it done tomorrow and im so excited. I just called my doc for you and my self about this question and she said NO NOT AT ALL will it be effected. My doc is the best in Texas so hope that gives light to your answer.

give me a buzz on aol instant messanger

or email me

Im also and would love to keep in touch to share my lasik experience with someone my age who can relate with what I have!
Last edited by houstonman on Thu Aug 09, 2007 10:43 pm, edited 4 times in total.
houstonman
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 11:53 pm

Postby STFalcon » Tue Jul 10, 2007 10:53 pm

I should also add that I spoke to my friend who had LASIK several months ago. She says she loves it but the loss of "crispness of vision" has definitely happened for her. She says she misses having crystal clear vision but thinks she will get used to it eventually.
STFalcon
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 8:37 pm
Location: Illinois

Postby houstonman » Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:00 pm

STFalcon wrote:I should also add that I spoke to my friend who had LASIK several months ago. She says she loves it but the loss of "crispness of vision" has definitely happened for her. She says she misses having crystal clear vision but thinks she will get used to it eventually.


really? man thats tuff. I work with photo shop daily so im praying I dont lose the said crispness. I also do alot of photo taking. Im pretty sure if worst came to worst some reading glasses could fix the problem? The only time I hear you lose crispness is if you are in your 40's... are your friends same age as you?

do you feel you might back out for any reason? what kind of work do you do?

by the way my email was sorry about that heh. The aol name is right though
Last edited by houstonman on Thu Aug 09, 2007 10:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
houstonman
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 11:53 pm

Postby STFalcon » Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:21 pm

Yes, she is 24. I am considering backing out because I am starting to feel that it's not worth the risk of compromising my vision in any way at all just for the convenience of not dealing with contacts and glasses. I think I would be disappointed if I even had some minor problem like loss of crispness or trouble with driving at night, and I would probably wish I had just stuck with the contacts. I feel like contacts and glasses are not so horrible that I would trade them for less perfect vision. Also, it's true that I could always reschedule the surgery for another time but I can't take it back after it's done. I might be annoyed by my contacts later on down the road and think I should have had the surgery, but it's probably better to wish I had done it than to regret having done it...if that makes any sense.

I am a medical student. I am only a second-year, so at this point, it is mostly lectures and books, but I intend to go into surgery, and I worry that any vision problems that might result from LASIK would prevent me from
doing that.

Also, I have spoken to my ophthalmologist, and he is extremely confident that I will be very happy with the results. I almost feel like he is brushing off my concerns, and I worry that he is biased.
STFalcon
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 8:37 pm
Location: Illinois

Postby sere1 » Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:36 pm

I'm 23 and had LASIK almost 3 months ago. My vision is great now (I was -6.5 for each eye). It is the same as if I had contacts (which corrected me to 20/15).

Not everyone has had as great a result as I have. However, if you have researched this (your cornea can take the LASIK despite the previous incidents; everything else tests ok), you should be fine. If you are VERY nervous about it, maybe you should postpone the surgery and get another surgeon/practitioner's opinion.

Your friend's loss of crispness could be due to dry eye, if she had it very recently. For me, the dry eye was like having a dirty contact in, or contacts that had been in for 18+ hours, where it would start burning and my eyes would need to refocus a lot. Artificial tears took care of that for me, but I had a mild case.

In terms of near vision loss, that is mainly for people who are about 40--about the age when presbyopia occurs.

For the first few weeks, my vision did fluctuate--my left eye was fuzzy, and my right eye would take over, etc. That hasn't happened for several weeks now. I work with small things, and I need crisp vision. I've been fine to work with microscopes, etc.

Just don't expect miracles to happen right away.
sere1
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 9:34 am
Location: NE Ohio

Postby houstonman » Tue Jul 10, 2007 11:51 pm

STFalcon wrote:Yes, she is 24. I am considering backing out because I am starting to feel that it's not worth the risk of compromising my vision in any way at all just for the convenience of not dealing with contacts and glasses. I think I would be disappointed if I even had some minor problem like loss of crispness or trouble with driving at night, and I would probably wish I had just stuck with the contacts. I feel like contacts and glasses are not so horrible that I would trade them for less perfect vision. Also, it's true that I could always reschedule the surgery for another time but I can't take it back after it's done. I might be annoyed by my contacts later on down the road and think I should have had the surgery, but it's probably better to wish I had done it than to regret having done it...if that makes any sense.

I am a medical student. I am only a second-year, so at this point, it is mostly lectures and books, but I intend to go into surgery, and I worry that any vision problems that might result from LASIK would prevent me from
doing that.

Also, I have spoken to my ophthalmologist, and he is extremely confident that I will be very happy with the results. I almost feel like he is brushing off my concerns, and I worry that he is biased.


I hope seri above has shined light for you. Im tellin you... there is nothin to be affraid of. Away from this site im part of the largest forum in the nation and I spoke with several people who have had it done and 20/20 people say the exact same thing "Its the best thing I have ever spent money on and wouldnt take it back for the world"

Millions have done it and if the crispness was an issue trust me... it wouldnt be hard to find that out through tons of reviews. Mine costs 4,450 of which I have already paid and I think that is well worth being able to see. My friend had his done with the freakin blade and he is able to see like a champ.

You are deff at the stage I was in yesterday... so many thoughts of no no no... losing sleep... wondering.... YOU HAVE TO watch this documentary vid... you will love it and it will inspire u the way it has me....

http://www.realitylasik.com/default.asp ... M1Nw%3d%3d

let me know what you think about the documentary when your done. She deff expressed the same feelings we both have in the vid.
houstonman
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 11:53 pm

Postby sere1 » Wed Jul 11, 2007 12:11 am

I posted before I saw your last answer--about how if any small thing went wrong, you would regret LASIK.

No surgery is perfect; all have risks. LASIK risks are extremely minute, but if you're willing to risk corneal ulcers (which have already happened), instead of the risks of LASIK, don't get the surgery.

It's an elective surgery that you should be comfortable with. I can say "Yeah, you'll do great," but they're your eyes--and you'll have to live with the results.

Only do this if you feel like you should. Don't let us talk you into something you'll regret. (Or out of something that you just have last-minute jitters about.)

This site is for information, not to make the actual decision. :)
sere1
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 9:34 am
Location: NE Ohio

Postby JPD » Wed Jul 11, 2007 12:23 am

STFalcon wrote:I should also add that I spoke to my friend who had LASIK several months ago. She says she loves it but the loss of "crispness of vision" has definitely happened for her. She says she misses having crystal clear vision but thinks she will get used to it eventually.


It doesn't sound like her eyes are completely healed if it's only been a few months since her procedure. It really does take a minimum of 6 months for the vast majority of Lasik patients to really achieve there final vision. I can tell you my vision is the same crystal clear 20/15 I had with contacts, and far better then I ever had with glasses. I never notice even the slightest bit of contrast sensitivity loss. My current problems are night vision related due to dryness. Once my tear production returns to normal, everything should be excellent.

But that is my experience, and I have had moments of regret about the surgery because I didn't get the immediate results I was hoping for. Backing out sounds like it might be a wise choice for you. You have many doubts, and you should never have any elective surgery unless you're 100% positive about it.
JPD
 
Posts: 160
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2007 3:09 am
Location: Southern California

Postby Betty39 » Wed Jul 11, 2007 3:51 am

There are no guarentees with this surgery. You take a risk. The statistics are in your favor. But again, nobody knows exactly how YOUR eyes will respond to this surgery. Most people do fine.
I have had persistant dry eye since my surgery 9 months ago. However my vision is very good, better than with my contacts and glasses. I also notice floaters which I can ignore. Overall I am happy with the vision. It's good enough for me. For my line of work it's okay. Yours may be another story.
The dry eye alone has been very difficult and distracting. I had no dry eye that I knew of pre surgery. But it's a known "risk" for this surgery.
If I were you and you HAD to have perfect vision for your occupation, I personally wouldn't take a risk like that. And I would learn to live with the glasses because corneal ulcers can potentially effect your vision too.
But I've learned alot about just leaving one's self alone.
Good luck in your decision whatever it may be.
Betty39
 
Posts: 130
Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 11:21 pm
Location: Ventura CA

Postby DryEye » Wed Jul 11, 2007 3:41 pm

If you decide to do this only do it with one of the best even if that means going to another state. Do your research and don't be in a hurry to do it.
That way you will have the best odds in your favor.
You want this to go well immediately not end up here on this board afterwards trying to learn all you can and figure out what to do from there.
Yes, you can have 20/20 or 20/30 and not have things be crisp and clear, which may be fixable with an enhancement.
DryEye
 
Posts: 282
Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2006 4:59 pm

Postby JPD » Wed Jul 11, 2007 5:30 pm

DryEye wrote:If you decide to do this only do it with one of the best even if that means going to another state. Do your research and don't be in a hurry to do it. You want this to go well immediately not end up here on this board afterwards trying to learn all you can and figure out what to do from there.


That's a good point, but even so it still doesn't always work that way. I had a perfect surgery(according to a corneal specialist who examined me) and I'm still here asking questions.
JPD
 
Posts: 160
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2007 3:09 am
Location: Southern California

STFalcon, did you do it?

Postby Borderline » Sun Jul 29, 2007 4:22 pm

I was just checking in to see if you decided to go through with the surgery. I noticed that your in illinois, i'm right outside of St. Louis on the Missouri side.

I too agonized over the decision to get LASIK. I think it's important that you keep realistic goals. Most people get LASIK and have relatively no/minor complications. The problem is you can't expect for everything to be perfect and not settle for anything less. You have to go into the surgery hoping for the best but being prepared for any complication that can come your way. You made the right decision to research before you had the surgery. I think this makes things even scarier, but it is always better to be informed first.

It was funny, before my surgery everyone was so excited for me. They were joking about me throwing my glasses out the window and drowning my contacts. I would always say, "I hope that I don't need them anymore, but there is no gurantee". People didn't understand why I wasn't jumping out of my seat excited before surgery. I was mentally prepared to accept the outcome of my surgery. I even almost backed out more than once.


With that being said, I had the surgery a little over a week ago and I am very happy with my results so far. I had minor complications(a flap wrinkle), but my vision is getting better all the time. Honestly, I am just thrilled and amazed that I can see without my glasses. I can not tell you how excited you are the day after surgery. It's like there is a whole new world out there and you can't wait to check it out with your "new eyes"!

In the end you will make the decision that is right for you. There is never any harm in postponing a surgery until your ready for it, or cancelling completely.
Borderline
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2007 9:22 pm
Location: Missouri


Return to Thinking About It

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest