MORE QUESTIONS ABOUT LASER SURGERY

If you are thinking about having Lasik, IntraLasik, PRK, LASEK, Epi-Lasik, RLE, or P-IOL eye surgery, this is the forum to research your concerns or ask your questions.

MORE QUESTIONS ABOUT LASER SURGERY

Postby cindylu » Mon Mar 19, 2007 12:50 am

I am seriously considering laser surgery to correct my vision. Just to review, I am 35 have mild nearsightedness -2.00 and -2.25. I have a few questions pertaining to LASIK. I understand that the flap never heals. Is this true? I'll admit, this kind of weirds me out on the whole thing. Does it not reattach itself somehow or is just floating around on your eye. I am very much an outdoors person and the thought of getting grit, dust of somehow damaging the flap unnerves me. Also, is it true that if laser surgery corrects your distance vision, it will decrease your near. I currently can see fine within about 18 inches. I do know I will need reading glasses when I reach my 40's just not prepared for that now. Is it possible to correct my near vision in the future somehow if this happens? If so, which procedure would be best? Thanks for the info! I just want to make sure I make an informed decision!
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Re: MORE QUESTIONS ABOUT LASER SURGERY

Postby LasikExpert » Mon Mar 19, 2007 8:36 am

cindylu wrote:I understand that the flap never heals. Is this true?


The flap heals, but not like a scratch on your arm. It is always different. You should read about Lasik flap healing.

cindylu wrote:I'll admit, this kind of weirds me out on the whole thing.


You may consider a surface ablation technique like PRK, LASEK, or Epi-Lasik. These do not use a Lasik flap.

cindylu wrote:Also, is it true that if laser surgery corrects your distance vision, it will decrease your near.


Near vision is a function of accommodation. Accommodation is when the natural lens within the eye changes shape to focus on near objects. At around 40 the natural aging process reduces accommodation to the point that we are less able to focus on near objects. This is called presybopia and is when reading glasses or bifocals become necessary. Laser surgery does not change your accommodation. Your near vision after successful laser surgery will be what it is now when you are wearing corrective lenses.

You state you understand that you will need reading glasses in the future, however you may want to consider the relative advantage your current myopia (nearsighted, shortsighted) vision may provide in 5-10 years. Read about Sudden Presbyopia.
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