"perfect candidate" Intralase or microkeratome?

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"perfect candidate" Intralase or microkeratome?

Postby GeneralPatientInquiry » Mon Jun 05, 2006 6:24 am

Hello,

I've been thinking of having LASIK to correct my (mild) nearsightedness.I have visited two clinics and in both cases I've been told I am a "perfect" candidate.

In one clinic I was recommended the use of Intralase for creating the flap (note, in this clinic they also perform "Custom Cornea" but they said it would have not made a difference in my case), in the other they said that Intralase may create more problems than the Microkeratone which, instead, is well proven.

My questions are:
1) Which one is safer: Intralase or the microkeratone?
2) How do I know if these clinics tell me I'm a "perfect"
candidate only to get themselves another business or if I really am one?

Thanks in advance,
Walter
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Postby LasikExpert » Mon Jun 05, 2006 6:26 am

Walter,

I have reviewed studies for Intralase and in my opinion it is better than a mechanical microkeratome on the issue of safety and predictability. There is a small possibility of short-term swelling that could cause poor vision for a few days after surgery. The other possible downside is photophobia that manifests a few weeks after surgery, but seems to respond well to steroids and just plain healing. IMO the advantage of precision and safety outweigh these rare and relatively uneventful downsides. We have a detailed article on Intralase you may want to read. My bet is that the doctor who does not like Intralase has never actually done an Intralase flap.

If your myopia is below 6.00 diopters, you should be investigating the surface ablation techniques of PRK, LASEK, and Epi-LASIK. These eliminate the need for a flap and thereby eliminate the possibility of any flap related complication during surgery or for your lifetime. Remember, once you have had LASIK, you have always had LASIK.

In my opinion there is no such thing as a perfect candidate because there is no such thing as a perfect surgery or a perfect surgeon. All surgery carries risk, and LASIK is no exception. Even persons who appear to be "perfect" can have a poor result, although that is relatively rare. If you visit three different refractive surgeons and they are all saying essentially the same thing, then either you are a good candidate or incredibly unlucky in your choices in surgeons.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
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Postby GeneralPatientInquiry » Wed Jun 14, 2006 5:37 am

Dear Glenn,

thanks for your reply. I have to say I did not expect such a clear and honest reply: I'm really glad.
I have on emore question though: in your reply you say that I may consider LASEK which does not require the flap.
I actually never heard of it. My myopia is around 3 dioptries so well within your suggested range.
This post is a reprint of a previously requested inquiry received by USAEyes.org via email.
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Posts: 110
Joined: Tue May 30, 2006 8:00 pm

Postby LasikExpert » Wed Jun 14, 2006 5:39 am

You will find answers to most of your questions at LASEK Details
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 6:43 am
Location: California


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