Lasik VS Lasek VS IntraLasik

If you are thinking about having Lasik, IntraLasik, PRK, LASEK, Epi-Lasik, RLE, or P-IOL eye surgery, this is the forum to research your concerns or ask your questions.

Lasik VS Lasek VS IntraLasik

Postby arya6000 » Mon Jul 02, 2007 5:48 pm

Hey guys

I'm 19 and 6 month old, I went for an consultation about 4 month a go for lasik and they said I'm a candidate, and they recommended custom lasik to me because of my high prescription. My eyes are about -7.50. At that office they only do Lasik and it was called Lasik MD. In this 4 month I have watched many videos about Lasik, Lasek and IntraLasik. I liked Lasek out of all the other ones. But When I was reading about Lasek on Wikipedia, it said that Lasek is good for people that can't get Lasik, why is that why can't Lasik candidates get Lasek? Which one is the Safest surgery out of all?

Thank You
arya6000
 
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Postby LasikExpert » Mon Jul 02, 2007 7:22 pm

A surface ablation like LASEK, PRK, or Epi-Lasik (all three are virtually the same, so I'll refer only to PRK) is not just for those who cannot have Lasik. They are viable techniques that stand on their own, but they are not appropriate for every situation.

The first step of Lasik is to create a flap of corneal tissue. This flap, created with a laser or mechanical microkeratome, is about 100-160 microns thick. The flap is moved out of the way, the laser reshapes the exposed area, and the flap is repositioned over the treatment area.

At least 250 microns of corneal tissue must remain untouched to maintain stability in a healthy cornea. With the Lasik flap, the reshaping starts at 100-160 microns down. If your cornea is a little too thin, then starting at the top with PRK and saving 100-160 microns of tissue is an advantage.

Once you have had Lasik you have always had Lasik. Although the Lasik flap heals, it is always different. Eliminating the Lasik flap means eliminating any possibility of a Lasik flap complication. Although the probability of a Lasik flap complication is relatively low, no possibility of a complication is always better than a low probability.

Although PRK sounds like it wins the race, the recovery for PRK is much different than Lasik. With Lasik it is possible to have fully functional vision within a day. PRK will provide poor vision for 1-3 days, "fucntional fuzzy" vision for about a week, and the crispness will evolve over the next several weeks to months.

PRK, LASEK, Epi-Lasik, Lasik, and All-Laser Lasik all have their advantages and disadvantages. Which is most appropriate - if any - can only be determined after a comprehensive evaluation by a competent doctor.
Glenn Hagele
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Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
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Postby arya6000 » Mon Jul 02, 2007 7:34 pm

Thanks for your great explanation, Recovering time is not important for me. At the consultation the doctor said that I might need readjustments after a while, and said I have a 30% chance of being able to get it if I have custom Lasik. If I get PRK would that chance go higher?

And I have GPC which I find contacts very uncombable, but after PRK they put a contact lens on the eye is that safe for a patient with GPC?

Thank You
arya6000
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Jul 02, 2007 1:16 am

Postby LasikExpert » Mon Jul 02, 2007 7:44 pm

A history of Giant Papillary Conjunctivitis (GPC) is not an automatic contraindication for laser eye surgery, however the GPC needs to be fully resolved and the effects of the medications used need to be expelled from your system. Antihistamines are commonly used if the GPC may also relate to an allergic response. Antihistamines can dehydrate and hydration is an important aspect of successful Lasik.

GPC is commonly caused by a contact lens related problem. Switching types and even brands of contact lenses may make a difference. The bandage contact lens you will have after PRK will be in only 3-7 days. If your GPC is fully resolved, then this should not be a problem.

There is a very high probability that you will have regression of effect. Your surgeon may elect to deliberately overcorrect you from myopia (nearsighted, shortsighted) vision into hyperopia (farsighted, longsighted) vision with the expectation that regression will bring you back to plano (no refractive error). The doctor may also decide to initially correct you to plano, allow you to regress, and then retreat you back to plano. Either way, expect changes during the first 3-6 months.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 6:43 am
Location: California


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