Good results... strange side effect.

Research your concerns in this forum or post your questions if you have had Lasik, IntraLasik, PRK, LASEK, Epi-Lasik, RLE, or P-IOL within the past three months.

Good results... strange side effect.

Postby jg243 » Sat Aug 02, 2008 6:30 pm

Hey guys and gals,

About 54 hours ago, I had my LASIK performed (my doctor used the Allegretto Wave with Wave Front technology). The day of surgery was scary... my vision was probably 20/40 with lots of blurriness. Yesterday, I was at roughly 20/25 (according to check up doctor) with some blurriness. Now today I am most likely the same, but much less blurriness (its still there though). I am hoping to be 20/20 in the next few days. But that leads to my question...

Why is it that when I turn my head and look out of the corner of my eye I can see better than I can when looking at something straight on? I can honestly say I have 20/20 when I do that. When I look at an object and then turn my head while keeping my eyes fixed on it, the blurriness goes away. Its not major, but it is noticeable.

Besides that I seem to be doing very well... No halos, no glare, no ghosting, some slight starbursting but that is even getting better very quickly. If you need more details on my eyes... I was 20/600 before surgery with -7.25 in my right eye and -7.50 in my left.

Thanks!
jg243
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2008 3:43 am

Postby jg243 » Sat Aug 02, 2008 8:31 pm

Also, when can I start working out again? I lift weights and would like to start as soon as I can without straining my eyes. If you have ever lifted before, you know what I mean, as when you are towards the end of a set you tend to strain to get out the last few reps, and you can almost feel a "pressure" all over your head, including the eyes.
jg243
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2008 3:43 am

Postby LasikExpert » Sat Aug 02, 2008 9:49 pm

The cornea healing after Lasik is not uniform. Some areas are going to heal faster than others. There can be inflammation of the cornea - also irregular. Inflammation can cause changes in refractive error, making one part of the cornea in focus and another part out of focus. If you put a target object in the area of good focus, things will be more sharp.

You had a very high refractive error and it is very reasonable to expect fluctuation in vision and some Lasik regression.

Myopia (nearsighted, shortsighted) vision is commonly caused by the eye being elongated. Unfortunately, the retina inside the eye is not similarly elongated. The retina is a layer of light sensitive cells on the inside back of the eye that transforms images into nerve signals. The elongation of your eyes puts pressure on the retina to pull away from the back of the eye. This is a retinal detachment and can cause permanent vision loss.

It is very important for you to recognize that even though you no longer need glasses because of your Lasik, you are still myopic over 7.00 diopters. That is, your eye is still elongated and your retina still has this added pressure to detach.

This brings us to your weight lifting. Lifting and other similar activities can raise the pressure inside the eye. The effect of this intraocular pressure (IOP) change be problematic, especially of your retina is distressed. Even after your doctor clears you for lifting, you need to have a comprehensive eye examination on a regular basis.

As to when you can start lifting, you need to talk to your doctor. You are undoubtedly using steroid eye drops that can raise the IOP, and the doctor needs to affirm the health of your eye.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 6:43 am
Location: California

Postby jg243 » Sun Aug 03, 2008 4:15 am

OK, that all makes sense to me, except for the fact that I don't see why LASIK would effect my myopia. I thought that LASIK just carved away at the surface of the cornea. Are you saying that even if I hadn't had LASIK, I should still be careful about lifting? Because I am taking the steroids it might make it worse? My eye doctor told me a long time ago that I am at a somewhat higher risk than most people for tearing, but never said I couldn't exercise. Basically what I guess my primary question is: Will LASIK make my chances of tearing worse (post steroids) or would your warning been just as relevant had I not chosen to get LASIK?
Last edited by jg243 on Sun Aug 03, 2008 4:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
jg243
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2008 3:43 am

Postby jg243 » Sun Aug 03, 2008 4:18 am

*EDIT*

I woke up this morning (about 20 hours since I orginally posted this topic), and I am fairly certain I am seeing 20/20. I am so happy that I want to cry. However you have me somewhat scared now with this whole regression thing (probably for the best though so that I can prepare for it), and now I am curious as to how much I will most likely regress.

My eyes have naturally changed in the past 2 years, but very, very little. With the surgery how much can I expect them to change? I am only 22 years old and very healthy, which my surgeon said would be working in my benefit as far as properly healing. From the article you provided for me and a little more research I have done I realize that people who have to have a lot of "tissue" removed are more susceptible to changes. But I can't find any info on how drastic these changes would be.

Basically my surgeon offers a "touch up" if your eyes fall beyond 20/40 within a year of the initial surgery... Can expect my vision to get that bad again within a year? If not, how much should I expect my eyes to change from LASIK regression alone? And next time I see my surgeon (this coming friday), what should I be asking in terms of both my myopia and the possibility of regression?

Thank you very much Lasik Expert; helping people out like this just to do it is a highly honorable thing to do, especially over the internet. Myself and most likely many others, appreciate it highly.
jg243
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2008 3:43 am

Postby LasikExpert » Sun Aug 03, 2008 8:18 pm

jg243 wrote:Are you saying that even if I hadn't had LASIK, I should still be careful about lifting?


Yes, to a degree. Just don't ignore your eyes' health and the strain that lifting can put on them.

jg243 wrote:Because I am taking the steroids it might make it worse?


The steroid eye drops commonly prescribed after Lasik to control inflammation and healing often increase the intraocular pressure (IOP) of the eye. The increased IOP in combination with the stress of lifting may be too much for your eyes to handle. Your doctor needs to let you know when it is okay to lift.

jg243 wrote:My eye doctor told me a long time ago that I am at a somewhat higher risk than most people for tearing, but never said I couldn't exercise.


Although your myopia is high, it is not astronomically high. Exercise, even strenuous exercise, may not cause any problem at all, however to keep your eyes healthy it would be wise to have them checked regularly even though you no longer need glasses.

jg243 wrote:Will LASIK make my chances of tearing worse (post steroids) or would your warning been just as relevant had I not chosen to get LASIK?


After you are off the steroids and your eyes have stabilized, your risk of retinal detachment after Lasik would be virtually the same as your risk before Lasik. That was exactly the important point. Don't think that because you don't need glasses you are not myopic. Your eye is still the same and needs the same care and consideration after Lasik as before.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 6:43 am
Location: California

Postby jg243 » Sun Aug 03, 2008 8:32 pm

OK, very good. I do go to see my eye doctor every 6 months or so, even when I don't need a new pair of glasses, just to see what he says about my retina situation. How about the chances/extent of regression?

Once again, thank you very much... with the info you are providing me, I will be much better off when going for checkups.
jg243
 
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2008 3:43 am

Postby LasikExpert » Sun Aug 03, 2008 8:44 pm

jg243 wrote:However you have me somewhat scared now with this whole regression thing (probably for the best though so that I can prepare for it),...


I have no desire to create unnecessary fear, but if you started regressing and didn't know what it was/meant, you might be even more fearful.

jg243 wrote:...and now I am curious as to how much I will most likely regress.


That is very difficult to predict. Your doctor may have slightly overcorrected you to accommodate expected regression. The doctor can use steroids to help control the healing response. In any case, regression of no more than 0.50 to 1.00 diopters would be the most to reasonably expect.

jg243 wrote:My eyes have naturally changed in the past 2 years, but very, very little. With the surgery how much can I expect them to change?


Once your eyes have healed, the changes after Lasik would likely be exactly the same as if you did not have surgery.

jg243 wrote:I am only 22 years old and very healthy, which my surgeon said would be working in my benefit as far as properly healing.


Both your young age and your good health are helpful toward quick and full recovery from any surgery.

jg243 wrote:From the article you provided for me and a little more research I have done I realize that people who have to have a lot of "tissue" removed are more susceptible to changes. But I can't find any info on how drastic these changes would be.


It is hard to predict, but that 0.50 to 1.00 diopter range seems reasonable.

jg243 wrote:Basically my surgeon offers a "touch up" if your eyes fall beyond 20/40 within a year of the initial surgery... Can expect my vision to get that bad again within a year?


You will likely know what regression you will experience (if any) at 3-6 months postop. Then you will know if enhancement surgery ("touch up") is necessary.

jg243 wrote:And next time I see my surgeon (this coming friday), what should I be asking in terms of both my myopia and the possibility of regression?


Because of your youth and health, the natural lenses within your eyes have the ability to change shape and thereby change focus to see objects near and far. This is called accommodation. Accommodation also allows you to "focus around" a small amount of refractive error.

If you want to demonstrate the "focus around" effect, go to your local drug store and find the reading glasses. Select a pair that are +1.00 diopter. Look at a distant object in the store, then put the reading glasses on while you continue to look at that distant object. For a moment the object will be out of focus, then your eyes will "focus around" the 1.00 diopter change from the reading glasses and you will be able to see the distant object well.

Even now you could be a little off the ideal Lasik correction, but your eyes are simply focusing around the error to provide you excellent vision.

After your eyes are healed and all is settled, ask your doctor if a cycloplegic refraction would be appropriate. A refraction is when the doctor uses test lenses to determine your refractive error (which is better, one or two?). A cycloplegic refraction determines your refractive error without accommodation. This provides a more true evaluation of the success of your Lasik.

With the cycloplegic refraction you will know your true refractive error without your eyes focusing around anything. If this error is great, your doctor may recommend enhancement surgery even though you are currently able to see well with your accommodation. If there is no difference in your refractive error with or without accommodation, or if the difference is small, the risk of additional surgery would likely not be worth the small and possibly imperceptible difference.

jg243 wrote:Thank you very much Lasik Expert; helping people out like this just to do it is a highly honorable thing to do, especially over the internet. Myself and most likely many others, appreciate it highly.


Thank you for the kind words. I'm glad to be of service, but the real heroes are the Lasik doctors who have voluntarily submitted to our certification process and support our organization. Without them, we could not exist.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 6:43 am
Location: California


Return to Just Had It

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 1 guest

cron