Computer use after Lasik

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Computer use after Lasik

Postby johnson1615 » Thu Mar 15, 2007 4:02 am

After looking at monitor for about 15-20 minutes, the vision in my left eye really gets bad. My right eye doesn't change at all.

I am 2 weeks post op.

Should I not be using computer?
So far, this is the only activity that affects my vision.
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Postby LasikExpert » Thu Mar 15, 2007 4:14 am

Computer use is notorious for exacerbating dry eye, with or without Lasik. Next time it occurs, apply a drop or two of preservative-free artificial tears and see if vision improves. It is possible for one eye to have more dry eye symptoms than the other.

Does your vision return to normal if you look away from the computer for a few minutes? Your eyes may be adjusting to the new range of focus. See our article on Lasik focus strain for details.
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Postby johnson1615 » Thu Mar 15, 2007 4:24 am

The article was helpful.....could be the new range of focus.
The eye that has trouble is the one that has regressed. I really don't think this eye knows what is going on. I t seems confused a LOT! It is currently at -1.00. When I put the Systane tears in it doesn't help a lot. Actually, after I use the tears my eyes feel drier than before the tears...??? They start to feel better after about an hour...... I have been using Bausch and Lomb Advanced Eye Relief Nighttime Eye Ointment at Night and this seems to be helping some...

After being on he computer and the eye gets "out of Focus", it actually stays out of focus for up to 2 hours at a time...
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Postby LasikExpert » Thu Mar 15, 2007 5:06 am

This does sound like an accommodation issue. You will want to discuss this with your doctor.

Are you at or around age 40?
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Postby johnson1615 » Thu Mar 15, 2007 9:44 pm

Yes, I am 44...

What is an "accommodation" issue?
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Postby LasikExpert » Thu Mar 15, 2007 9:54 pm

Accommodation is the natural lens of the eye changing focus to see near objects.
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Postby johnson1615 » Sat Mar 17, 2007 2:28 am

Is that as complicated as it sounds? How about correcting?
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Postby LasikExpert » Sat Mar 17, 2007 6:02 am

Inside the eye, underneath the clear front cornea and behind the colored iris, is the natural crystalline lens. This lens is pushed and pulled by tiny muscles around the outer edge of the eye that are connected with a meshwork of fibers. Think trampoline with bungee cords holding everything suspended and tight.

Accommodation is the process of these muscles flexing and relaxing, changing the shape of the crystalline lens.

Presbyopia is the reduction of this ability to accommodate, usually related to age.

There is no cure for presbyopia. No artificial lens mimics the process of accommodation well. Monovision helps, but is not the same as accommodation. Reading glasses and bifocals work well, but are often not desirable. Everything to deal with presbyopia is some sort of compromise.
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Postby johnson1615 » Sat Mar 17, 2007 1:37 pm

I think I understand. Simply put, my trampoline springs are sticking a little!

I find if I don't use the computer too long and if I use the gel or ointment drops I seem to do better. i have stayed busy all week volunteering at my son's school and tried not to 'focus' on my eyes too much and that has helped a lot! I was doing really well until I noticed an eye chart in an office. Now I find I am drawn to check the chart periodically.

Thanks for the help!
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Postby LasikExpert » Sat Mar 17, 2007 4:54 pm

Yes, you've lost some bounce in your bungee. It is reasonable to expect your eyes to learn to adapt to the new range of correction, however presbyopia is a natually occuring limitation on near vision and is likely to progress over the ensuing years.
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