Reading on computer after PRK

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Reading on computer after PRK

Postby mmxx » Sat Jun 09, 2007 3:20 pm

I know that one should not read too much on computer right after PRK as it makes your eyes dry and slows healing, but can anyone here who makes a living by looking at computer 8 hours a day (software developer etc) tell me, about how long after PRK (2 weeks? 1 month?) you can manage to do your work without too much discomfort?

I know different people heals differently, but I'd like to have a rough idea how the average time is like so I can arrange my work schedule a bit better before op.

Appreicate your response
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Postby LasikExpert » Sat Jun 09, 2007 7:14 pm

There will be a difference between what you can do and what you should do. The ability to read a computer screen can be accomplished within a few days after PRK, although there may be some difficulty and everyone's healing response will vary. Because you can does not mean you should without proper regard for your healing eyes. Rest your eyes often, even for a few seconds if that is all you have. Use preservative-free artificial tears. Take breaks when you can.
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Postby mmxx » Sun Jun 10, 2007 4:26 pm

Thanks alot for the response. I have 10 days rest before I go back to work (full time computer job), but if it's really beneficial to my healing I _can_ take more days off although not preferrable.
I'm just wondering how much of a difference it'd make between looking at computer all day (with artifical tears of course) and not looking at all, in terms of healing speed and complications.
If having eyedrops as often as I can and try to rest as much as I can while at work is good enough, or is comparable to how you heal when you don't look at computer at all, it'd be at least good to know.

well guess that's probably an impossible question to answer since everyone is different. I have a -8.00 nearsightedness and -1.25 astigmatism, 7mm pupil, they said 140 microns will be removed (out of my 511). Does higher power means longer recovery time?
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Postby LasikExpert » Sun Jun 10, 2007 6:02 pm

The process for physicial healing is generally not affected by the amount of correction. The probability of fluctuation during healing, PRK regression of effect, and the need for PRK enhancement surgery is greater for high correction.

Another way to put it is that your eyes may physicially heal fine, but that does not guarantee that you won't have some minor refractive error that may require you to wear glasses on ocassion until you have an enhancement.
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Postby mmxx » Sun Jun 10, 2007 11:44 pm

My doctor told me I won't be able to have an enhancement because of my cornea thickness and my prescription. Is there any data like what percentage of people with myopia greater than -6.00 end up needing an enhancement to get within 20/40? I'm assuming being 20/40 or better means no enhancement is needed.

Also, the regression you talked about (that's more likely for higher prescription), will it be a temporary problem only during the healing months or is it a permanent one?

thank you
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Postby LasikExpert » Mon Jun 11, 2007 5:31 pm

I don't know of published data for regression from a starting refractive error and much depends upon the individual's response, the postop medication regimen, and the technique used by the surgeon to deal with probable regression.

There is often fluctuation during the healing stage, but regression of effect can be permanent.

I very highly recommend that you be fitted with disposable contact lenses that would simulate undercorrected vision after PRK and regression (say, -1.00 D). See if this vision is adequate. PRK will undoubtedly improve your refractive error, but if it is still so bad that you need glasses after PRK, then you may want to consider if you really want to risk surgery.
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Postby mmxx » Mon Jun 11, 2007 10:54 pm

LasikExpert wrote:I don't know of published data for regression from a starting refractive error and much depends upon the individual's response, the postop medication regimen, and the technique used by the surgeon to deal with probable regression.

There is often fluctuation during the healing stage, but regression of effect can be permanent.

I very highly recommend that you be fitted with disposable contact lenses that would simulate undercorrected vision after PRK and regression (say, -1.00 D). See if this vision is adequate. PRK will undoubtedly improve your refractive error, but if it is still so bad that you need glasses after PRK, then you may want to consider if you really want to risk surgery.


Thank you, I have never thought of doing that, but with my surgery 2 weeks away I don't know if there's enough time for that. I'll ask though and see what they say.
However, "adequate" vision for me is to be able to read text on computer screen at arm length (or even shorter). Are people with -1.00 myopia able to do that, in general? What's the equivalent vision in 20/xx terms for -1.00?

and if -1.00 is considered undercorrected, is 20/40 too? I know 90% can get to 20/40, but that's for all people (not the group with similiar prescirption as mine)...
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Postby LasikExpert » Tue Jun 12, 2007 12:16 am

I am deliberately -1.00 in my nondominant eye for monovision so I am able to read my computer screen without reading glasses.

Here is a poor, but workable, way to simulate -1.00 vision.

Visit your local drug store wearing your glasses that correct you fully for distance vision. Find the reading glasses and hold a pair of +1.00 reading glasses over your regular glasses. Looking through the combination of the two glasses will reduce your refractive correction for distance about the amount of the reading glasses.

Now that you are wearing two pairs of glasses, look around the store. Can you read at the distance of your computer monitor? Can you see objects in the distance well enough to drive? Distance vision will suffer while near vision should be good.

Try some +1.50 reading glasses and see what that is like. Try 0.75 readers if they have them available. Be sure to look in the distance to compare.

There will probably be some distortion due to the multiple lenses, but you will get an idea of what undercorrection may be like in the real world.
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Postby mmxx » Fri Jun 22, 2007 1:12 am

Thank you so much for the great suggestion! It was very helpful, I did get an idea of what that is like and to me, -1 maybe even -2 seems to be adequate for on screen reading (at less than arm length).
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