Suitability of Lasik for myself?

If you are thinking about having Lasik, IntraLasik, PRK, LASEK, Epi-Lasik, RLE, or P-IOL eye surgery, this is the forum to research your concerns or ask your questions.

Suitability of Lasik for myself?

Postby DaveZ » Thu Mar 11, 2010 5:05 am

I have some questions about the suitability of Lasik surgery for myself.

I am extremely nearsighted, so much so that I have trouble finding my glasses, if I have not put them in my regular location, without my glasses on. When I don't have my glasses on, I can see things up close very well, I am not farsighted. I do a lot of very small electronic circuit repair and have no problem doing so without my glasses on. I do have to hold things fairly close to my eyes to see close up, at arms length my nearsightedness causes things to be pretty blurry, so I read books either very close-up without my glasses on, or at arms length with glasses on. When I wear contact lens I can not see things close-up, it appears that the correction for my nearsightedness makes me farsighted. So if I were to have Lasik surgery to correct my nearsightedness would I then most likely need glasses for farsightedness?

Since I do so much work with very small electric circuits, I don't think it would be good for me to end up farsighted. Also, even if I found the the need for reading glasses acceptable, would my extreme nearsighted correction cause me to have create a problem in how thick my cornea would be in areas after the corrective surgery?

I have worn glasses since I was 9 years old, and I am now in my 40s. My nearsighted vision has regularly gotten worse with my age, requiring that I get a new prescription every 3-5 years. Would this mean that even if I was corrected to somewhere close to 20/20 with Lasik that in a few years I may require glasses again?

Can anyone tell me what was that new unapproved surgery that Team USA bobsled driver had to correct his vision so he could keep driving? I think they surgically put a lens behind his cornea, if I remember right from watching the Olympics.

Thanks in advance.

Dave
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Re: Suitability of Lasik for myself?

Postby PRKorIntacs » Thu Mar 11, 2010 7:40 am

You may have meant IOL where they remove your lens and implant another lens that corrects your myopia and as a bonus, prevents you from ever getting cataracts. This is an option you can read into. I don't know how high your myopia is, -6? -7? -8? It may make sense to aim for near vision(I am going for -1.5 myself) so you can see without reading glasses and only need distance glasses for driving and other occasional purposes. The other reason im aiming for an undercorrection is to greatly reduce my chance of becomming farsighted, something you don't want either. Hope this helps.
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Re: Suitability of Lasik for myself?

Postby LasikExpert » Mon Apr 12, 2010 5:52 pm

DaveZ wrote:I read books either very close-up without my glasses on, or at arms length with glasses on. When I wear contact lens I can not see things close-up, it appears that the correction for my nearsightedness makes me farsighted. So if I were to have Lasik surgery to correct my nearsightedness would I then most likely need glasses for farsightedness?


What you describe sounds like presbyopia, not an overcorrection into hyperopia (farsighted, longsighted). Lasik cannot "repair" presbyopia, but there are workarounds like monovision Lasik.

DaveZ wrote:Since I do so much work with very small electric circuits, I don't think it would be good for me to end up farsighted. Also, even if I found the the need for reading glasses acceptable, would my extreme nearsighted correction cause me to have create a problem in how thick my cornea would be in areas after the corrective surgery?


The greater the amount of correction, the more tissue must be removed. Your surgeon can measure the thickness of the cornea and determine if enough tissue would remain untouched to maintain stability. See our article on Lasik and high nearsightedness.

DaveZ wrote:I have worn glasses since I was 9 years old, and I am now in my 40s. My nearsighted vision has regularly gotten worse with my age, requiring that I get a new prescription every 3-5 years. Would this mean that even if I was corrected to somewhere close to 20/20 with Lasik that in a few years I may require glasses again?


Not only does it mean you would likely require glasses again, it may also mean that you are not a good candidate for any refractive surgery. By the fourth decade of life your vision should have stabilized. If not, there may be an underlying problem that would be a contraindication for Lasik. You should have a full medical eye examination by an ophthalmologist whether you are considering Lasik or not.

DaveZ wrote:Can anyone tell me what was that new unapproved surgery that Team USA bobsled driver had to correct his vision so he could keep driving? I think they surgically put a lens behind his cornea, if I remember right from watching the Olympics.


Steven Holcomb has keratoconus, which is a disease of the cornea. His doctor implanted a phakic intraocular lens (P-IOL) behind the iris and in front of the natural lens. P-IOLs are approved in the US, but not for a patient with keratoconus. Although Holcomb's vision was restored, the underlying keratoconus is not treated by P-IOLs. His vision will continue to deteriorate, which is why P-IOLs are not approved for patients with keratoconus.
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