gettin old I guess

Post your questions and start your research in this forum if more than three months ago you had any type of surgery to reduce the need for glasses and contacts.

gettin old I guess

Postby rips241 » Sat Nov 18, 2006 9:44 pm

Before I begin I would like to thank you for maintaining this site. A lot of questions are answered here that are either forgotten or not fully explained by our doctors. It’s a scary thing to have unexpected problems with your eyes. Thanks
I’m 3 weeks out now from lasik. VISX at LVI. My correction was typical for older folks. I’m 53. My near sight had declined and later my distance vision was no longer perfect. I elected to just correct my distance and not do the mono thing because of sports and stuff. I don’t have my numbers handy but the correction for distance vision, in my case, was not extreme. Somewhere between 1.25 and 2.
My one week appointment was uneventful. No problems with the flaps or anything. But one eye was “lagging” behind the other. My non-dominant eye. Left. I knew this because while closing one eye at a time they acted opposite each other. One could see close but not good far and vice versa. I think this is why my distance vision is so fuzzy right now. Question - is this normal at this stage and is that why my distance is fuzzy?
I’m really surprised at my ability to read without glasses. This wasn’t what I expected at all. Will this stay with me or change over the next few weeks?
And lastly, my “final” appointment is at 2 ½ months. If this eye doesn’t come around by then, is this too early to schedule an enhancement? Grrrr.

And yes, I use the artificial tears faithfully and had the 90day drain plugs put in.

I’m hoping I don’t need an enhancement and the associated recovery time again.
rips241
 
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Postby LasikExpert » Sun Nov 19, 2006 1:37 am

I suspect that the one eye is slightly undercorrected and/or has a bit of edema (swelling) that is causing it to be a little myopic (nearsighted, shortsighted). A little myopia in one or both eyes would explain why you can read better than expected, and why distance vision is not excellent.

If you have a refraction (which is better, one or two) you will get your current prescription. If through those lenses your vision is crisp for distance, then your problem is simple refractive error. If through the lenses your vision continues to be poor, then there is a different contributing problem.

Whether or not enhancement surgery is appropriate will depend upon your actual refractive error (if any) and if you are able to see clearly through exam lenses.

I know you did not want monovision, but that may be what you actually have. It seems very reasonable to at least consider accepting the advantages of near vision at the expense of less than perfect distance vision.
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not too bad

Postby rips241 » Sun Nov 19, 2006 7:59 pm

Thanks for the quick (weekend) reply.
I think you might be right about this mono vision I have now. My close up reading is not great but I don't need glasses for normal reading just fine print. My distance is still fuzzy but better than it was. So here we are stuck in the middle. Is this good enough ?? Maybe.. A little time will tell and a few late season rounds of golf... Thanks Glenn
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Postby LasikExpert » Sun Nov 19, 2006 8:25 pm

I have a suggestion for that "good enough" question. Have your doctor provide you with a pair of disposable contact lenses that give you full distance correction, and wear them religiously for a week. What you experience with contacts is what would happen if you had surgery to remove that small amount of myopia. You may find that what you have is not only good enough, but is actually preferred.

You can always have a pair of glasses made with full distance correction to use on the golf course or when driving...if they are actually needed.
Glenn Hagele
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I am not a doctor.
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give it a try

Postby rips241 » Wed Nov 22, 2006 2:38 am

Ok, sounds reasonable to try the temporary correction for distance. I have to admit that not using reading glasses is pretty darn nice. If this is what I have left then I'll just get some correction for driving and let it go at that. I do have one question though. I opted for, but didn't get, distance correction only because of a lose of depth perception. Is my depth perception really changed with this mono vision I now have? I haven't noticed anything so far...... Thanks Glenn
rips241
 
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Postby LasikExpert » Wed Nov 22, 2006 2:42 am

Different people adapt to monovision better than others. It would appear that your depth perception is not adversly affected by your current monovision.

With those contacts for distance, you will know just how much that near vision is important (or not) to you.
Glenn Hagele
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USAEyes

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I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
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Posts: 3309
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eyelid prob

Postby rips241 » Sun Dec 03, 2006 11:35 pm

Hi again Glenn,
A week or so after surgery, I felt something rubbing in my left eye. This is the eye that is lagging behind. Well my family eye doc says I have a small blib or calcium deposit in the eyelid. Very common. Its pretty far back like in the middle of the eyelid. At the time the doctor said let it go for 30 days or so and let the lasik heal some more. If, after that time, it is still bothering me he'll remove it. To get to the question here, Could this "deposit" mess up the surface enough to change my vision. I think I know the answer already....

thanks in advance
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Postby LasikExpert » Mon Dec 04, 2006 3:11 am

Much depends upon the size and location of the calcium deposit under your eye lid. Certainly its presence is not helpful, but there is too much variability for me to comment intellegently about the probably of it being problematic. Your doctor's advice is best, and it appears your doctor is not terribly concerned.

A gel eye lubricant at night may be a good idea.
Glenn Hagele
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I am not a doctor.
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almost done

Postby rips241 » Sat Dec 16, 2006 12:35 am

Hi Glenn
I just returned from my family eye doctor. He doesn't want to remove this calcium deposit unless it gives me more trouble than I'm having. He says its under a layer of skin and we should leave it alone. Just keep the eyes well lubricated. He also said this is very common and happens to all ages. Dust, allergies are a few of the possible culprits. He actually checked my right eye and it has some that I can't even feel. I asked if this could be the cause of this eye lagging the other. You know, dragging across and changing the tear film or something. He said "no". This might be something that the lasik surgeons should look for a little closer.
The good news is he checked my eyes out thoroughly and everything looks perfect. 20/20 with both. 20/20 right. 20/25 left. Looks like this gives me the mono we talked about. I can live with this...

I'd like to say one last question here but it probably won't be.....

When they check your eyes and say you are 20/20 or whatever what exactly does this mean? Sure I can read that chart across the room but my distance vision is not that great way out there. Also my close up is ok but fine print gives me a hard time. So if I'm close to 20/20 then why isn't my vision near perfect. My family doc had nothing to do with my lasik so I believe his results here but they seem a llittle deceptive. Maybe there needs to be another way of "grading" your eyesight?

Thanks again - I'm doing my part in keeping you in business here.
rips241
 
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Postby LasikExpert » Sun Dec 17, 2006 1:05 am

The Snellen acuity chart was developed about 150 years ago as a system of measurement of vision. The familiar "Big E" chart with black letters on a white background is designed to be seen from optical infinity, specifically 20 feet away from the patient.

20/20 means that the person sees an object 20 feet away with the clarity that a "normal" sighted person sees that object 20 feet away. 20/40 means that a person sees an object 20 feet away with the clarity that a "normal" sighted person sees that object 40 feet away. 20/15 means that the patient sees an object 20 feet away with the clarity that a "normal" sighted person sees that object 15 feet away.

Following is a more technical explanation from another source:

Prior to 1860 there was no systematic or "invented" method of measuring visual acuity. The analysis of the eye, and the recognition of nearsightedness as an "optical" issue was described by Johan Kepler ca 1600.

It had been recognize (from astronomy) that the human eye could resolve stars separated by 1 minute-of-arc (approximately). Dr. Snellen took this concept, and developed block letters that had widths of 1 minute-of-arc, for a letter-size of 5 minutes-of-arc.

A distance of 20 feet (or 6 meters) was established as reasonable "optical infinity". Thus this very-high resolution became the ability to read 3/8 inch (0.9 cm) letters at 20 feet.

Since most people could be "corrected" to this value with a proper-strength lens, it was then decleared that retinas that could resolve these
letters were 20/20, or "normal".
Glenn Hagele
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USAEyes

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I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
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history lesson

Postby rips241 » Sun Dec 17, 2006 10:46 pm

Wow, Optical history 101. Thanks
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Postby rips241 » Sun Jan 21, 2007 12:12 am

I just returned from my final checkup. Everything looks good and my eyes are 20/20 and 20/25 as expected. He prescribed Restasis for my dry eyes. My last question for this thread: I understand Restasis is an anti-inflamitory. Does it usually work and if it does how long before I can expect any results. When my eyes are dry theres a noticeable change in my distance vision.

Thanks
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Postby LasikExpert » Wed Jan 24, 2007 7:07 pm

Restasis is cyclosporine, an anti-inflammatory. It works by reducing inflammation that may squeeze the tiny channels that carry fluids for the tear film. Restasis requires about three months to achieve full effectiveness; however some relief may come earlier.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 6:43 am
Location: California


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