PRK recovery scenario

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PRK recovery scenario

Postby mbenaresh » Wed Jun 28, 2006 10:14 pm

I went for a consultation last week, and after taking all sorts of measurements, the doctor told me I have thin corneas and he would only recommend PRK.

Can anyone tell me what the datailed recovery scenario is for PRK, i.e., what you have to do, what restrictions you have, for how long? What are the usual and worst-case (or near-worst-case) scenarios?

I live by myself, so I am concerned about how long I can't drive.

Thanks
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Postby LasikExpert » Wed Jun 28, 2006 10:52 pm

For 1-3 days your vision will not be very functional. You won’t bump into walls, but you will not be able to read a prescription bottle, use a computer, and most certainly will not be able to drive. You will need someone with you during this time.

For 1-2 weeks after the initial few days you will have what I call “functional fuzzy” vision. You will be able to perform most tasks without assistance, but detailed vision will not have returned. You may or may not be able to drive. You probably will not want to drive at night.

For the remaining 2-4 weeks your vision will fluctuate throughout the day, but will steadily increase in clarity. The full crisp vision that you desire will not develop until about 4-6 weeks after surgery.

Everyone heals differently. This is a generalization of the process. Some people have very good vision within a week, others require more time.
Glenn Hagele
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Postby mbenaresh » Fri Jun 30, 2006 12:19 am

Hello Glenn,

I really appreciate the info. May I ask for some elaboration?

Given that PRK is done one eye at a time, do all of these functional restrictions still apply? I imagine I could read fine with my "good" eye, and possibly drive with something covering the healing eye, couldn't I?

I am also concerned with other details of the recovery, such as restrictions on diet, medications needed, and how often I need to visit the doctor. Since I live by myself, I have to burden friends with driving me, and the round trip will be around 1 hour.

Also, what about vision correction during healing? Am I expected to get new lenses at weaker and weaker correction during that time?

I am about to make an appointment with a 2nd doctor to get another opinion on the whole issue.

Thanks again,
Monte
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Postby LasikExpert » Fri Jun 30, 2006 12:42 am

If you are having one eye done at a time, then the primary restriction will relate to depth perception. With only one "good" eye, your ability to determine your distance from objects will be limted. This can affect your ability to drive during the first few days, but probably will not be problematic during the following few weeks.

Because of the imbalance between the two eyes it is also possible that you will suffer the symptoms of aniseikonia, which can include vertigo, nausea, headaches, etc. This would probably be mild (if at all), but don't be surprised if they occur. For details, read Aniseikonia

Most doctors provide examinations the day of surgery, day after, 1 week, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year. You may want to contact your surgeon and ask if there is a competent optometrist near you who could provide some of the postoperative care. This kind of comanagement may be very helpful in your situation.

Let your doctor know of any medications you are taking, including over-the-counter meds and supplements. If there is any restriction you will learn at that time. There is probably no restriction on diet.

Do not expect to get different lenses as you heal. Healing is so rapid that your lenses would be outdated within a few days. You would need lenses for the eye that had surgery only if there is a longer-term over or undercorrection.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 6:43 am
Location: California


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