Automatic Computer reading and True reading

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Automatic Computer reading and True reading

Postby Donchan » Mon Jul 10, 2006 1:05 am

Doctor does not explain about the detail of my eyes at all, and set up the operation day. I was worried and I had called up and asked my eye status. I think my eye correction is pretty high....
Doctor recommended me to do Mono, but I cannot accept the concept.

I am 45 years old.
Automatic computer readings are R -7.75 and L -7.55, but my reading powers are R -6.75 and L -6.55 according to the test. My both eyes have presbyopia of 1.25 or 1.50.
My Corneas are R 548 and L 550, astigmatism is -1.75 for both eyes.

Do you think Lasik is safe for my eye level?
Donchan
 
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Postby LasikExpert » Mon Jul 10, 2006 1:19 am

I think you may want to get at least one more evaluation before going into surgery.

Monovision can be a great method to work around presbyopia, but it is not great for everybody. IMO the best way to know is to try monovision with contact lenses first, then decide if you want this permanently. You should read about Monovision Lasik.

The reason for the difference between the automated and the subjective prescriptions needs to be determined, and your correct cycloplegic refraction without the advantage of your eye focusing needs to be determined to provide you the optimal information. If the automated evaluation was wavefront aberrometry and is more than 1.00 diopter off of your normal prescription, then wavefront may not be appropriate. Read about Custom Wavefront Lasik.

In my opinion, you are not ready to have surgery. More information needs to be determined, evaluated, and then you need to make a decision about what you want after being well informed about the probability of what you will receive.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
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follow up

Postby Donchan » Mon Jul 10, 2006 1:11 pm

Thank you for your quick reply.

Yes, Sir. I will ask my doctor what is the reason for the difference between the automated and the subjective prescriptions. Then, I will write again.

I actually tried on Monovision contact lenses for one month, but I developed a terrible shoulder ache and headache. I was tired all the time, and felt that one eye was always blocked from seeing. Then, I changed my contact lenses back from Monovision to my Distance contacts and those conditions got better.

My doctor laughed about my shoulder ache and said that he never heard about the problem before, and he said that it could be something else. He then recommended to do the Mono vision surgery. If I do not like Monovision, the doctor said that it is possible to change both eyes to distance. But I do not want to do more than one surgery.

My concern about the Mono vision is that at my age of 45 I will have further deterioration in my vision, and my Presbyopia condition will worsen.
My question is if I do Monovision what will happen to the distance eye and the near-focused eye? How will they become? Will both eyes be more distance focused?
Then, will I need the both distance and near glasses?

I understand that I need to have another check up for my eyes, but my doctor says he will do operation the day after the check up. I still have severe dry eyes too even though my doctor gave me eye drops (Restasis, and moisturize eye drops)

I am not sure about the Monovition and the doctor did not properly explain my eye condition to me in my opinion…
I have been wearing RG hard lenses for about 30 years from morning to night, but I have now been out of my contact lenses for 10 weeks and my vision is still fluctuating.
Donchan
 
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Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2006 1:36 am

Postby LasikExpert » Mon Jul 10, 2006 5:30 pm

It would appear that you are simply not ready for surgery yet. It can be problematic to have surgery when you also have fluctuation in your visual acuity that is beyond normal. Lasik often will induce temporary dry eyes and can exacerbate existing dry eyes. The dry eye problem needs to be resolved before you have surgery otherwise you will not really know what amount of dry eyes is natural and what is induced by surgery. Additionally, dry eyes can cause fluctuation in vision. Your visual fluctuation may be because of the long-term RGP use or because of dry eyes or other reasons. Whatever the reason, your eyes are not yet stable.

We recommend an extended period of time to be out of RGP lenses. You may want to read Lasik and Contact Lenses

If you feel you are informed enough to make a decision about having surgery within one day of learning the final numbers, then that may be appropriate. If you are not, either you need to consider a different doctor or your doctor needs to consider a different schedule.

At age 45 you probably do have some accommodation - the ability to change focus to objects near. When using monovision your eye was attempting to accommodate around the undercorrection. This does often cause headaches, but I have to admit that this is the first I've heard of a shoulder ache because of monovision. Monovision often requires some adjustment. As an example, you may have been undercorrected to maintain 2.00 diopters of myopia (nearsighted, shortsighted) vision, but actually would do better with a 1.50 diopter undercorrection. Monovision is often a matter of trial and error.

The changes to your eyes induced by surgery would be permanent. If you decide to have monovision and all goes as planned, one eye will be plano for distance and will stay plano for distance. The other eye will be myopic and will stay myopic. Your refractive error will not change, but your ability to accommodate may. As you lose accommodation, the value of monovision becomes greater and the probability of accommodation related headaches (and shoulder aches too) would be less. If you tried monovision over a year ago, you may want to try it in soft contacts again.

You may not be a good candidate for monovision today, but tomorrow may different.

The question you asked in your first post was if it appeared Lasik was safe for you. The answer to that question remains open. It is impossible to know if Lasik is safe until your eyes are stable, your dry eyes are managed, and a final decision about monovision is determined.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 6:43 am
Location: California

Thank you

Postby Donchan » Mon Jul 10, 2006 11:04 pm

Thank you very much for your time.
I appreciate your advice.
I will reconsider about the Lasik.
Donchan
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2006 1:36 am


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