8 Months Later - Good but a Little Double Vision

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8 Months Later - Good but a Little Double Vision

Postby David White » Wed May 02, 2007 8:26 pm

I've posted simiar updates/question before but have noticed one new thing.

I'm happy, I went from about 20-600 to my current 20-25. Not perfect, I've heard of better results but I am happy and absolutely not disappointed at all.

My left eye pretty much has no issues.

My right eye has a bit of a double vision / ghosting thing going. My optometrist isn't sure if it's a small astigmatism or if it's caused by dryness, which I do have. For now I'm taking Restasis to see if that helps.

What I've noticed, though, is the ghosting is only on things that glow. The florescent clock on the oven. The TV screen. The moon. Gas station lights. When I drive to work at 5:30 am (so it's dark and the lights glow) and look at the gas station signs and lights I see noticeable ghosting - but at the same time if I look at the stop sign which isn't lit up or glowing, I see that fine with no ghosting.

Does this new fact of the lighting/glowing being the only thing which causes the ghosting mean anything ?

Thanks.
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ghosting/double vision

Postby amilli » Wed May 02, 2007 10:02 pm

Hi,
Sorry, I don't know the answer to your question, but have similar symptoms with things like digital clocks, etc. and am very interested in the replies you receive. Tell me do you also have an issue with people at a distance? I tend to see an outline around people and/or things like their eyes at a distance? Just curious
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Postby David White » Thu May 03, 2007 1:42 am

I don't think I have noticed anything other than objects which have a glow of some kind like lights and images on clocks or TV, etc.
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Postby Remander » Sat May 05, 2007 6:15 am

I had a similar issue post-Lasik, and it continues somewhat, but less, a couple of weeks post-enhancement.

I see some "ghosts" of digital clocks and sometimes the fonts on the TV at night, but not in the day. My current experience is not so much ghosts (double images) but little streaks or tails of light coming off the images.

If I turn my head toward a light source or turn on a background light, the ghosts go away.

That indicates to me that the ghosting happens when the pupil is wide open in a dark setting. Bright light shrinks the pupil, and the ghosts go away.

I'm not sure if it will go away with time, but I hope so.
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Postby JPD » Sat May 05, 2007 6:18 am

Remander wrote:That indicates to me that the ghosting happens when the pupil is wide open in a dark setting. Bright light shrinks the pupil, and the ghosts go away.

I'm not sure if it will go away with time, but I hope so.


If it's a pupil size issue, it doesn't sound like it should go away.
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Postby David White » Sat May 05, 2007 3:43 pm

Remander wrote:I had a similar issue post-Lasik, and it continues somewhat, but less, a couple of weeks post-enhancement.

Interesting, that sounds similar to me. My wife is getting here eyes done at the same place I got mine done (out of town) so I may make an appointment the same time to see if I there's any enhancement they can do to make it better. I'm been wavering on that as I'm seeing 20/25 I don't feel the need to get lasered again but as I'll be there anyway I should probably talk it over with them.
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Postby LasikExpert » Mon May 07, 2007 7:15 pm

Astigmatism is when the cornea is not spherical like the top of a ball, but is elliptical like the back of a spoon. The "tip" of the spoon focuses some light off center and creates a secondary ghost or doubled image. The greater the amount of astigmatism, the greater the clarity of the ghost image.

If the pupil is small, light passing through the tip of the astigmatism is likely to be blocked by the iris and does not enter the eye to be "seen". This is why people tend to have ghosting in low light environments when the pupils are larger. You may want to read about Lasik night visionissues.

Any irregularity at the periphery of the cornea can cause poor vision when the patient is in a low light environment. Dry eyes can cause dry spots, edema (swelling), and an uneven corneal surface. If these problems are at the edge of the cornea, they may not be noticed when the pupils are small.

Light travels in different wavelengths. Those wavelengths are affected differently when they pass through otherwise clear material such as a cornea. The reason that the cornea is clear is because the cells are smaller than the wavelength of light. Like a bee can fly through chicken wire fence, but a chicken cannot, wavelengths of visible light can pass through a healthy cornea.

When the cornea is compromised or disrupted, such as with healing after Lasik, the arrangement of the cells in the cornea may block or bend certain wavelengths of light. If you bend a chicken wire fence enough, you can block a bumble bee's flight.

Light Emitting Diodes (LED) emit a very specific wavelength and of a very narrow spectrum. LED light passing through the cornea may be bent differently than other colors or even the same color from a different light source such as an incandescent traffic light. This bending of a specific and narrow wavelength can focus this light off center and cause a ghost image. Ghosting from LEDs, especially red LEDs, is not exactly common, but is a known problem that often resolves with healing.

The Lasik flap heals, but not like a cut on your arm. It is always different and it takes quite a bit of time for the process to complete. You may want to read about Lasik flap healing.

The ghosting problems described here may be due to residual or induced astigmatism, edema due to healing, dry spots in the tear film, or a yet to be healed disruption in the cornea. Depending upon the exact cause or combination of causes they can be permanent or temporary, however the vast majority of Lasik patients have these kinds of problems resolve.
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Postby David White » Sun May 13, 2007 5:45 am

LasikExpert wrote:Light Emitting Diodes (LED) emit a very specific wavelength and of a very narrow spectrum. LED light passing through the cornea may be bent differently than other colors or even the same color from a different light source such as an incandescent traffic light. This bending of a specific and narrow wavelength can focus this light off center and cause a ghost image. Ghosting from LEDs, especially red LEDs, is not exactly common, but is a known problem that often resolves with healing.

This sounds like it might be my issue because I'm noticing that even in dim light, I can see non light emitting objects with no ghosting whatsoever. But various light emissions (words on TV, letters on oven clock, letters on gas station) consistently give me ghosting. A negligible amount in the left eye, a noticable amount in the right eye.

When you say is often resolves with healing, could that still be the case after about 8 months or is my healing complete now ?

Also, one additional data point, the ghosting goes away if I close my top eyelid down just a little bit - not close to squinting but just a slight lowering of my top eyelid and the ghosting is gone completely.

Thanks, as always, for any input.
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Postby LasikExpert » Sun May 13, 2007 5:59 am

The physiology of the cornea continues to heal for an extended period of time. See Lasik Flap Healing.

The neurological component of "seeing" also changes. The brain learns how to ignore bad data. A good example is our blind spot where the optic nerve enters the eye at the retina. We all have big holes in our vision, but we don't "see" them. That is because the brain has learned how to ignore the blind spot. The brain does this with Lasik induced aberrations too.
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I am not a doctor.
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