Teeth Whitening & Dry eyes

Post your questions and start your research in this forum if more than three months ago you had any type of surgery to reduce the need for glasses and contacts.

Teeth Whitening & Dry eyes

Postby Betty39 » Fri Jun 22, 2007 6:20 am

Hello Glenn,

I am considering buying some whitening toothpaste as the "old pearly whites" aren't so pearly anymore. But before I do my husband strongly suggested I ask you if you know of anything in these types of over the counter teeth whitening products that can worsen dry eyes. I doubt there is any correlation, but since my hubby is understandably paranoid my eyes will get worse again I promised him I would check with you before I purchase anything.

Sorry if this is really off the wall... :)
Betty39
 
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Location: Ventura CA

Postby LasikExpert » Fri Jun 22, 2007 6:17 pm

Teeth whitening gels for intracoronal bleaching commonly use carbamide peroxide. The active ingredient in carbamide peroxide is hydrogen peroxide. The highest concentration is about 35% and is used for a brief period of time in the dentist's chair. The over-the-counter products for "walking bleach" are more likely to be around 10-22% carbamide peroxide.

Hydrogen peroxide is a skin and eye irritant, however in gel form and if used properly there does not seem to be anything about the product that would be especially problematic after Lasik or similar laser eye surgery.

The bleaching process works with a balance of concentration of active ingredient and time. The longer the product is on your teeth and the higher the concentration, the more whitening that will occur.

The overnight trays with the lower percentage carbamide peroxide are popular because of convenience, but for the first application you may want to try the product while you are awake and aware. If there is an irritation, you can remove the product as instructed in the product’s manual.

There is a six-to-eight percent chance of cervical resorption (bleaching inside the tooth), increasing to 18 to 25 percent when the technique is used in conjunction with heat. Heating the product has been almost universally abandoned. Internal resorption usually presents as gum sensitivity around the affect tooth and occurs at six months after internal bleaching. After two years the tooth is usually not restorable.

After completing this research for you it is my conclusion (I am neither a doctor nor a dentist) that getting your teeth white may not affect your eyes, but should probably be performed by a dentist with at clear understanding of the most safe methods and products.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
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Postby Betty39 » Fri Jun 22, 2007 9:17 pm

Glenn...you are awesome!!

Thank you so much for the time you must have put in to do all that research!

It is very much appreciated :)

I'm leaving my teeth alone until my scheduled cleaning in a few months..at that time I will consult my dentist about whitening. But having gone through so much already because I chose an elective procedure, I think I am going to leave myself alone.

Thanks you again!!
Betty
Betty39
 
Posts: 130
Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 11:21 pm
Location: Ventura CA

Postby LasikExpert » Sun Jun 24, 2007 8:59 am

I like questions that have not been asked before. They give me the opportunity to research and learn something new. Once it is answered, others with the same question have the answer available. This response is not a regular article at Lasik and Teeth Whitening.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 6:43 am
Location: California


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