Astimatism and permanency

If you are thinking about having Lasik, IntraLasik, PRK, LASEK, Epi-Lasik, RLE, or P-IOL eye surgery, this is the forum to research your concerns or ask your questions.

Astimatism and permanency

Postby The Pezman » Wed Dec 19, 2007 12:55 am

A few questions:

1. I went to a surgeon yesterday to talk about my potential eye surgery. We agreed PRK was the best option, and he did some preliminary testing, with more testing to follow should I decide to go through with it (including testing for kerituconis, which I probably spelled wrong). I am a twenty year old with an astigmatism (though it looks to be a fairly normal astigmatism with no current indication of kerituconis), and one thing he did mention was the possibility of my eye changing in the next few years. He compared it to a moving target, saying that even if we hit the mark now, the mark could change. Of course, he was sure to gloss over that point in his attempt to get me to agree to the surgery.

Any follow-up surgeries within the first year are free, but any time after that I think I'd have to pay full price. What is the likelihood that my eye may change within the next five to ten years and require a second (or more) surgery to be performed?

2. My dad spoke to an acquaintance whose son is an ophthalmologist. She said he said there was some new technology being worked on to make surgery better for those with astigmatisms. Obviously this info is thirdhand, so I was wondering if you knew of any such technology in the works that her son might have been referring to.

3. Does the time of year make a significant difference regarding recovery? My chiropractor had LASIK and recommended the summer, as opposed to the winter when the air is dryer. Her reasoning was that, since the eyes have to be kept moist for a few days it'd be easier to do in the summer.

4. Are there latent symptoms? That is, can things start to happen one or two months after the surgery that weren't apparent a week or two afterwards?
The Pezman
 
Posts: 11
Joined: Thu Feb 08, 2007 1:41 am

Re: Astimatism and permanency

Postby LasikExpert » Fri Dec 21, 2007 3:01 am

The Pezman wrote:What is the likelihood that my eye may change within the next five to ten years and require a second (or more) surgery to be performed?


A good way to know is to look at your history. Has your prescription been stable (within 0.25 diopters) in the last 3-5 years? If yes, then a significant amount of change is less likely. If no, then your refractive error is not stable and you are likely to have changes in the future.

The Pezman wrote:Obviously this info is thirdhand, so I was wondering if you knew of any such technology in the works that her son might have been referring to.


The physics of astigmatism correction are not going to change. What is constantly being improved is the algorithm of the laser to more accurately correct both sphere (myopia and hyperopia) and cylinder (astigmatism). The most recent and significant improvement has been wavefront-guided vision correction surgery.

High astigmatism correction can be much more challenging than moderate or low astigmatism. The amount of your myopia (nearsighted, shortsighted) or hyperopia (farsighted, longsighted) vision will also be a consideration.

The Pezman wrote:3. Does the time of year make a significant difference regarding recovery?


Lasik tends to induce dry eye, PRK less so. A more humid or moderate time of year without heavy heating or blasting air conditioning may be best if you already have marginally dry eyes. People have surgery throughout the year with no problems or unusual events.

The Pezman wrote:...can things start to happen one or two months after the surgery that weren't apparent a week or two afterwards?


PRK has a much slower vision recovery than Lasik. You will have pretty poor vision for 1-3 days, "functional fuzzy" vision of 1-3 weeks, and it may be 2-3 months before you start getting that really crisp vision you desire. Most things that can go wrong would go wrong in the early stages. There are a few late onset problems, but they are rather rare, especially with PRK.
Glenn Hagele
Volunteer Executive Director
USAEyes

Lasik Info &
Lasik Doctor Certification

I am not a doctor.
LasikExpert
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3309
Joined: Fri May 12, 2006 6:43 am
Location: California


Return to Thinking About It

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests