Total Blurred Vision in One Eye

Research your concerns in this forum or post your questions if you have had Lasik, IntraLasik, PRK, LASEK, Epi-Lasik, RLE, or P-IOL within the past three months.

Postby LasikExpert » Thu Sep 04, 2008 5:25 pm

This makes perfect sense. You are probably just a bit hyperopic (farsighted) and that is reducing your 20-50 foot distance vision, maning the near to 20 foot vision very difficult, and allowing far distance vision to be okay. At your next appointment, ask your doctor about your current refractive error.

The late day change could be due to dry eye or because the natural lens within your eye is tired of "focusing around" the hyperopia to provide good vision.
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Postby gluonspin » Thu Sep 04, 2008 5:41 pm

Thanks.
So this raises another question though. If I am a bit farsighted, why is it only in my right eye, the blurry one? Is this something that should improve in the same way the far away object blurriness improved? Plus, in the morning I can make out objects within 20-50 ft range fine, only after a few hours does the "farsighted blurriness" set in.

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Postby LasikExpert » Thu Sep 04, 2008 6:19 pm

The natural lens within your eye has the ability to change shape and thereby change focus. Because the desired target was not reached with Lasik, your lens is constantly "focusing around" the residual refractive error. In the morning, when your lens is rested, it is easier to achieve this focusing and so you are able to see better than in the evening when your eye is tired.

This situation will commonly present vision clarity fluctuations throughout the day as the eye focuses and relaxes. You may also experience a momentary blur and then clear vision as the eye changes from relaxed (out of focus) to focused.

You won’t harm your eyes by this focusing around, but it can lead to eye strain that may present headaches, nausea, dizziness, vertigo, and/or poor depth perception.

Your doctor will undoubtedly perform a cycloplegic refraction (which is better, one or two) with the natural lens paralyzed. This will show your true refractive error without the focusing around. This is the error that will need to be corrected with glasses, contacts, or enhancement surgery.
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Postby gluonspin » Thu Sep 04, 2008 7:36 pm

Its been about 50 days since my Lasik surgery and now I have improvement. My doctor feels that the blurriness is from inflammation. I wonder and hope that with more time I will have complete recovery and improved vision?
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Postby LasikExpert » Thu Sep 04, 2008 10:18 pm

Inflammation of the cornea can and will change your refractive error. At some point the healing process will end and you will know what - if any - refractive error remains.
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Postby gluonspin » Sat Sep 20, 2008 3:33 am

Is there a general timeframe that can be considered when expecting healing to be complete? I had my surgery 64 days ago and my right eye is still blury with intermediate range objects and those at about the distance of a computer screen. Once more, at night my right eye distance vision is not as good as during the day. I've also noticed that under better light quality my vision is better than under artificial lighting.
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Postby LasikExpert » Sat Sep 20, 2008 5:30 pm

Everyone is different, but Lasik results tend to be stable at 90 days and complete at six months.
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Postby gluonspin » Sun Sep 21, 2008 9:49 pm

Being that I am right eye dominant and that my left eye is 20/15 and my right eye is 20/25 but blurry at virtually every distance, do I run the risk of having long-term issues focusing with my dominant eye? For instance, I am in the security business and require the use of my dominant eye in taking aim. Currently it feels like I am struggling to aim through my right eye and often I notice that my left eye visual field "takes over" and I see the wrong part of the firearm. I shoot with both eyes open, as is required in the field I am in; if I close the left eye, I can see the sites but of course they are blurry. This is really frustrating...
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Postby LasikExpert » Mon Sep 22, 2008 12:25 am

If your vision limitation is simple refractive error, these problems would be fully resolved with a pair of glasses or contact lenses. While you may not be "damaging" your eyes by not wearing corrective lenses, you are making your natural lens within your eye work overtime trying to "focus around" your refractive error.
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Postby gluonspin » Tue Oct 07, 2008 6:47 am

If I am now a bit hyperopic/farsighted, then did the surgery "over correct" my nearsightedness? If so, I understand that refraction might help but is enhancement out?

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Postby LasikExpert » Tue Oct 07, 2008 8:13 am

Overcorrection may have been planned or unplanned. See Lasik overcorrection for details.
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Postby gluonspin » Tue Oct 07, 2008 6:22 pm

So if my eye was over corrected unexpectedly, what then? Will I have to back to refractive care?
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Postby LasikExpert » Tue Oct 07, 2008 7:06 pm

Regression is common if the original refractive error was high. It may resolve on its own. If not, glasses, contact lenses, or enhancement surgery to resolve the hyperopia would be the choices.

You probably should not have enhancement surgery until 3-6 months postop to allow as much regression as possible. You are past two months postop and additional regression is not likely, but is still possible.
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Postby Pappy » Mon Oct 13, 2008 6:10 pm

LasikExpert wrote:Regression is common if the original refractive error was high. It may resolve on its own. If not, glasses, contact lenses, or enhancement surgery to resolve the hyperopia would be the choices.

You probably should not have enhancement surgery until 3-6 months postop to allow as much regression as possible. You are past two months postop and additional regression is not likely, but is still possible.


Glan I have a question on this 3-6 month time line thing. Read some research that states it takes abotu 2 years for lasic and about 1 year for prk for 95% nerve ending regeneration.

In my mind it would seem those time lines are the "true" heal rates. Why is the 3-6 month time frame used. As in why that date.

Thanks!
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Postby LasikExpert » Tue Oct 14, 2008 7:05 am

Pappy wrote:Glan I have a question on this 3-6 month time line thing. Read some research that states it takes abotu 2 years for lasic and about 1 year for prk for 95% nerve ending regeneration.

In my mind it would seem those time lines are the "true" heal rates. Why is the 3-6 month time frame used. As in why that date.


Nerve cell density resumes to pre-operative levels at about 3 years postop for Lasik and about 1-2 years postop for PRK, which in the scheme of things has very limited relevance.

The nerve cell density is not an issue relative to stabilization of the eye. It is nerve sensitivity that is important. You can have all the density in the world, but if there is no sensitivity then it makes no difference. Equally, you can have very low nerve cell density, but if the nerve sensitivity is functional and adequate, then the function of those nerves is important.

I see this particular "lying the truth" statement from time to time on the Internet. The statement is accurate, but the inference is a lie. It is like saying the pavement on the road is 10 inches thick instead of 12 inches thick. It makes no difference whether or not you will be getting to the grocery store.
Glenn Hagele
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